Brain and muscle learning will be the focus of Friday’s plenary session at ECSS Dublin 2018. The topic is approached from modern day perspectives by two fantastic speakers. Professor David Vaillancourt from University of Florida (USA) talks about “Linking brain dysfunction and motor unit physiology in essential tremor”. Professor Kristian Gundersen from University of Oslo (Norway) on the other hand discusses “Muscle memory a cellular model from muscle atrophy and hypertrophy”. The session is chaired by Professor Paul Greenhaff from University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). Please read below Professor Greenhaffs’ introduction to the session.

“This plenary lecture will compare and contrast perspectives that exercise adaptation is a central nervous system phenomenon vs. a muscle cell phenomenon and will be delivered by eminent researchers using contemporary and powerful quantitative approaches.
From the perspective of the central nervous system, functional gains arising from exercise training can be achieved from motor learning, which is a form of procedural memory that involves consolidating a specific motor task into memory through repetition. When a movement is repeated over time, a long-term muscle memory is created for that task, eventually allowing it to be performed without conscious effort. From another perspective, the term muscle memory describes a cellular memory resident in skeletal muscle in which hypertrophy is 'remembered', such that a muscle fibre that has previously been large, but subsequently lost its mass, can regain mass faster than naive muscle fibres, and can be explained by muscle myonuclei number.
The plenary will be of major interest to clinicians, neuroscientists, psychologists, physiologists, exercise therapists and sports scientists in general, and in particular colleagues interested in adaptation through exercise in training and rehabilitation.”

#3keythings

  • Exercise adaptation can be both central nervous system phenomenon and muscle cell phenomenon.
  • When a movement is repeated over time, a long-term muscle memory is created for that task, eventually allowing it to be performed without conscious effort.
  • When a muscle fibre has previously been large, but subsequently lost its mass, it can regain mass faster than naive muscle fibres. This can be explained by muscle myonuclei number.

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See you on Friday 6 July 2018 in Auditorium at 11:30 – 12:45 at the CCD!

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